At The War’s End

Today started off as any other day. I came into work, stuck on a particularly pleasant Chieftains/Sinead O’Connor song that I’d heard at the beginning of a Dropkick Murphys gig the other day, and opened up Word. What I wasn’t counting on was the Deputy Editor of HD Review coming over with a slightly haunted … Continued

blu-ray-logo-718027.jpegToday started off as any other day. I came into work, stuck on a particularly pleasant Chieftains/Sinead O’Connor song that I’d heard at the beginning of a Dropkick Murphys gig the other day, and opened up Word. What I wasn’t counting on was the Deputy Editor of HD Review coming over with a slightly haunted look in his eyes, asking if I’d heard the news regarding HD DVD.I hadn’t, since although I’m interested in high definition and freelance for that magazine, I don’t keep up to date with it on a daily basis.Anyway, it seems that it’s the season for resolution of conflict, with the WGA reaching an agreement with the AMPTP, and now, Toshiba dropping HD DVD from their production schedules and long term plans. In a press release, the CEO of Toshiba stated that they “carefully assessed the long-term impact of continuing the so-called ‘next-generation format war’ and concluded that a swift decision will best help the market develop”.So in other words, Warner Bros  and WalMart really screwed us over, and we’re cutting our (substantial) losses while we can?How this’ll affect the company remains to be seen, but what we’re really worried about is how it affects us, let’s be honest. The single format is probably a good thing for high definition in the long run, however it does mean an end to the competition in terms of price cuts that have littered the battlefields of this conflict of late. While Sony and their consortium of Blu-ray supporters still have to win over standard definition users, don’t expect the same kind of bargains that you may have been nabbing recently.Personally I think that competition is a good thing, but the HD war did go too far. Warner Bros essentially made HD DVD users second class consumers by releasing enhanced Blu-ray discs, while Sony practically told early adopters to like it or leave it when they upped the profile of the format. Hopefully this won’t lead to a monopoly over high definition, particularly as there are some great releases coming out soon (both old and new, having had the pleasure of checking out I Am Legend and The Omega Man/28 Million Miles To Earth recently), but at least we can finally put that Blu-ray/HD DVD argument to bed and focus on what’s really important – who’s going to get the chop at Toshiba?I’m kidding. What’s important is The Sarah Connor Chronicles premiering this week. Watch it!