Opinion – Battlestar Galactica: Blood and Chrome

Another Battlestar spin-off rears its head – how do we feel about it?

Another Battlestar Galactica pilot is on the horizon, then, one that we called a few months ago, no less: “This, to us, is the most likely scenario for a spin-off – William Adama’s presence in Caprica was probably more than just a red herring for fans to enjoy. The entire franchise is about his character, in so many ways, and we know he’s a link in the chain when it comes to the First Cylon War.” That was back in issue 42, shortly before the Blood and Chrome series was greenlit as webisodes – now that it’s a pilot in its own right, with a series no doubt waiting in the wings, we’re more optimistic about the franchise now than we’ve been in a long time.

Caprica’s recent sliding ratings hadn’t imbued us with a great deal of optimism, but Blood and Chrome promises something altogether more crowdpleasing as a premise: a full-on war between humans and Cylons, no doubt filled with battle sequences that its fellow spin-off, centered on family conflict as it is, infrequently dabbles in. That’s not to say Caprica is taking the wrong approach. It’s just that Blood and Chrome, with its BSG prefix and use of more familiar franchise iconography, stands a better chance of finding a big audience.

Besides, it’s a vital part of the overall story in the series. This could be grander than Battlestar in its scope, but the fascinating possibility of Blood and Chrome will be in seeing how the story (if at all) intersects with the other two series. Wouldn’t it be great to have all three shows forming the complete story of how the Cylons were created, right up until the entirely baffling end of Battlestar?

Of course, another approach could suggest that it’s unnecessary to flesh everything out in the BSG mythos, that perhaps this background detail is best left to our imaginations; regardless, I hope Blood and Chrome makes it to series.

Here’s David Eick talking about the series in Syfy’s press release for the series:

“While maintaining the themes of politics, social propaganda, and the timeless question:  what does it mean to be human? – ‘Blood & Chrome’ will also return us to the authentic, relentless depiction of combat and the agony and ecstasy of human-Cylon war, which was the hallmark of ‘Battlestar Galactica’s’ early seasons.”