Battleship Blu-ray review

Peter Berg’s Battleship is out on Blu-ray, DVD, and Blu-ray/digital copy from 20 August 2012.

2,153 views comments
Rihanna Battleship
Released:
20 August 2012
Certificate:
12
Director:
Peter Berg
Cast:
Taylor Kitsch, Alexander Skarsgård, Rihanna, Liam Neeson
Distributor:
Universal Pictures UK
Running Time:
131 mins
Price:
£15
Buy on Amazon If you like this, try... Transformers

Similarly brainless and based on toys, but fun with it. Just don’t expect the same from the two sequels.

Eagerly anticipated by absolutely no one, Battleship represents a shamelessly cynical attempt to encroach on the success of the Transformers franchise with its own pastime-inspired blockbuster. But while the first instalment of the aforementioned series at least achieved guilty pleasure status, all you’ll find here is guilt at having wasted your time for no pleasure.

Despite raising hopes with an amusing bar-set sequence that introduces us to slacker protagonist Alex (Taylor Kitsch) and stern older brother Stone (Alexander Skarsgård), the tone is set by a hilarious (for all the wrong reasons) ‘soccer’ sequence in which Skarsgård takes the mantle of least-convincing on-screen goalkeeper since Sylvester Stallone in Escape To Victory.

From here, the downward spiral perpetuates.

The kindest thing you can say about Battleship is that it is mostly inoffensive in its bone-headedness (save for its portrayal of scientists as snivelling weasels intent on destroying the world by being all smart), but that doesn’t change the fact that having already required the viewer to suspend belief in the outlandish concept, it demands a further acceptance of the various wanton acts of stupidity – intercut with sound bites for the trailers and TV spots – committed throughout.

Faced with this overwhelming spectacle, there is little room for real acting. Kitsch is the only one given a rounded character to play – Skarsgård seems to exist only to voice disapproval, Liam Neeson’s Captain Shane is underused and Rihanna is entirely incidental to the plot – which he manages to make inject with genuine pathos, but he’s almost a lone voice, fighting alongside rival-turned ally Yugi (Tadanobu Asano) against a rally of explosions and Pow! Boom! etc.

By the time the rushed finale finally comes about (which includes an unwelcome post-credits sting), the overwhelming feeling is of relief.

Tags: , , ,